Powershell for Linux!

Microsoft has been making a lot of inroads in the Open Source and Linux communities lately.  Linux and Unix purists undoubtedly have been skeptical of this recent shift.  Canonical for example, has caught flak for partnering with Microsoft recently.  But the times are changing, so instead of resenting this progress, I chose to embrace it.  I’ll even admit that I actually like many of the Open Source contributions Microsoft has been making – including a flourishing Github account, as well as an increasingly rich, and cross platform platform set of tools that includes Visual Studio Code, Ubuntu/Bash for Windows, .NET Core and many others.

If you want to take the latest and greatest in Powershell v6 for a spin on a Linux system, I recommend using a Docker container if available.  Otherwise just spin up an Ubuntu (14.04+) VM and you should be ready.  I do not recommend trying out Powershell for any type of workload outside of experimentation, as it is still in alpha for Linux.  The beta v6 release (with Linux support) is around the corner but there is still a lot of ground that needs to be covered to get there.  Since Powershell is Open Source you can follow the progress on Github!

If you use the Docker method, just pull and run the container:

docker run -it --rm ubuntu:16.04 bash

Then add the Microsoft Ubuntu repo:

# apt-transport-https is needed for connecting to the MS repo
apt-get update && apt-get install curl apt-transport-https
curl https://packages.microsoft.com/keys/microsoft.asc | apt-key add -
curl https://packages.microsoft.com/config/ubuntu/16.04/prod.list | tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/microsoft.list

Update and install Powershell:

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install -y powershell

Finally, start up Powershell:

powershell

If it worked, you should see a message for Powershell and a new command prompt:

# powershell
PowerShell
Copyright (C) 2016 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

PS />

Congratulations, you now have Powershell running in Linux.  To take it for a spin, try a few commands out.

Write-Host "Hello Wordl!"

This should print out a hello world message.  The Linux release is still in alpha, so there will surely be some discrepancies between Linux and Windows based systems, but the majority of cmdlets should work the same way.  For example, I noticed in my testing that the terminal was very flaky.  Reverse search (ctrl+r) and the Get-History cmdlet worked well, but arrow key scrolling through history did not.

You can even run Powershell on OSX now if you choose to.  I haven’t tried it yet, but is an option for those that are curious.  Needless to say, I am looking for the

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Curl on Windows using a Docker wrapper

Does the Windows built-in version of “curl” confuse or intimidate you?  Maybe you come from a Linux or Unix background, and yearn for some of your favorite go-to tools?  Newer versions of Powershell include a cmdlet for interacting with the web called Invoke-WebRequest, which is useful, but is not a great drop in replacement for those with experience in non Windows environments.  The Powershell cmdlets are a move in the right direction to unifying CLI experiences but there are still many folks that have become attached to curl over the years, including myself.  It is worth noting that a Windows compatible version of curl has existed for a long time, however it has always been a nuisance dealing with the zip file, just as using SSH has always been a hassle on Windows.  It has always been possible to use the *nix equivalent tools, it is just clunky.

I found a low effort solution for adding curl to my Windows CLI flow, that acts as a nice middle ground between learning Invoke-WebRequest and installing curl binaries directly, which I’d like to share.  This alias trick is a simple way to use curl for working with API’s and other various web testing in Windows environments without getting tangled in managing versions, and dealing with vulnerabilities.  Just download the latest Docker image to update curl to the newest version, and don’t worry about its implementation across different systems.

Prerequisites are light.  First, make sure to have the Docker for Windows app installed (stable or beta are both fine) as well as a semi-recent version of Powershell.

Next step.  If you haven’t set up a Powershell profile, there are also lots of links and resources about how to do it.   I even wrote about it recently, so I am skipping that step as well.  Start by adding the following snippet to your Powershell profile (by default located in C:\Users\<user>\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1) and saving.

# Curl alias using docker
function Docker-Curl {
   docker run --rm byrnedo/alpine-curl $args
}

# Aliases
New-Alias dcurl Docker-Curl

Then source you terminal and run the curl command that was just created.

dcurl -h

One issue you might notice from the snippet above is that the Docker image is not an “official” image.  If this bothers you (security concerns, etc.), it is really easy to create your own, secure image.  There are lots of examples of how to create minimal images with Curl pre-installed.  Just be aware that your custom image will need to be maintained and occasionally rebuilt/published to guard against future vulnerabilities.  For brevity, I have skipped this process, but here’s an example of creating a custom image.

Optional

To update curl, just run the docker pull command.

docker pull apline-curl

Now you have the best of both worlds.  The built-in Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet provided by Powershell is available, as well as the venerable curl command.

My number one case for using curl in a container is that it has been in existence for such a long time (less bugs and edge cases) and it can be used for nearly any web related task.  It is also much handier to use curl for those with a background using *nix systems, rather than digging around in unfamiliar Powershell docs for similar functionality.  Having the ability to run some of my favorite tools in an easy, reproducible way on Windows has been a refreshing experience while sliding back into the Windows world.

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Backing up Jenkins configurations to S3

If you have worked with Jenkins for any extended length of time you quickly realize that the Jenkins server configurations can become complicated.  If the server ever breaks and you don’t have a good backup of all the configuration files, it can be extremely painful to recreate all of the jobs that you have configured.  And most recently if you have started using the Jenkins workflow libraries, all of your custom scripts and coding will disappear if you don’t back it up.

Luckily, backing up your Jenkins job configurations is a fairly simple and straight forward process.  Today I will cover one quick and dirty way to backup configs using a Jenkins job.

There are some AWS plugins that will backup your Jenkins configurations but I found that it was just as easy to write a little bit of bash to do the backup, especially since I wanted to backup to S3, which none of the plugins I looked at handle.  In genereal, the plugins I looked at either felt a little bit too heavy for what I was trying to accomplish or didn’t offer the functionality I was looking for.

If you are still interested in using a plugin, here are a few to check out:

Keep reading if none of the above plugins look like a good fit.

The first step is to install the needed dependencies on your Jenkins server.  For the backup method that I will be covering, the only tools that need to be installed are aws cli, tar and rsync.  Tar and rsync should already be installed and to get the aws cli you can download and install it with pip, from the Jenkins server that has the configurations you want to back up.

pip install awscli

After the prerequisites have been installed, you will need to create your Jenkins job.  Click New Item -> Freestyle and input a name for the new job.

jenkins job name

Then you will need to configure the job.

The first step will be figuring out how often you want to run this backup.  A simple strategy would be to backup once a day.  The once per day strategy is illustrated below.

backup periodically

Note the ‘H’ above means to randomize when the job runs over the hour so that if other jobs were configured they would try to space out the load.

The next step is to backup the Jenkins files.  The logic is all written in bash so if you are familiar it should be easy to follow along.

# Delete all files in the workspace
rm -rf *

# Create a directory for the job definitions
mkdir -p $BUILD_ID/jobs

# Copy global configuration files into the workspace
cp $JENKINS_HOME/*.xml $BUILD_ID/

# Copy keys and secrets into the workspace
cp $JENKINS_HOME/identity.key.enc $BUILD_ID/
cp $JENKINS_HOME/secret.key $BUILD_ID/
cp $JENKINS_HOME/secret.key.not-so-secret $BUILD_ID/
cp -r $JENKINS_HOME/secrets $BUILD_ID/

# Copy user configuration files into the workspace
cp -r $JENKINS_HOME/users $BUILD_ID/

# Copy custom Pipeline workflow libraries
cp -r $JENKINS_HOME/workflow-libs $BUILD_ID

# Copy job definitions into the workspace
rsync -am --include='config.xml' --include='*/' --prune-empty-dirs --exclude='*' $JENKINS_HOME/jobs/ $BUILD_ID/jobs/

# Create an archive from all copied files (since the S3 plugin cannot copy folders recursively)
tar czf jenkins-configuration.tar.gz $BUILD_ID/

# Remove the directory so only the tar.gz gets copied to S3
rm -rf $BUILD_ID

Note that I am not backing up the job history because the history isn’t important for my uses.  If the history IS important, make sure to add a line to backup those locations.  Likewise, feel free to modify and/or update anything else in the script if it suits your needs any better.

The last step is to copy the backup to another location.  This is why we installed aws cli earlier.  So here I am just uploading the tar file to an S3 bucket, which is versioned (look up how to configure bucket versioning if you’re not familiar).

export AWS_DEFAULT_REGION="xxx"
export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID="xxx"
export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY="xxx"

# Upload archive to S3
echo "Uploading archive to S3"
aws s3 cp jenkins-configuration.tar.gz s3://<bucket>/jenkins-backup/

# Remove tar.gz after it gets uploaded to S3
rm -rf jenkins-configuration.tar.gz

Replace the AWS_DEFAULT_REGION with the region where the bucket lives (typically us-east-1), make sure to update the AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID and AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY to use an account with access to write to AWS S3 (not covered here).  The final thing to note, <bucket> should be replaced to use your own bucket.

The backup process itself is usually pretty fast unless the Jenkins server has a massive amount of jobs and configurations.  Once you have configured the job, feel free to run it once to test if it works.  If the job worked and returns as completed, go check your S3 bucket and make sure the tar.gz file was uploaded.  If you are using versioning there should just be one file, and if you choose the “show versions” option you will see something similar to the following.

s3 backup

If everything went okay with your backup and upload to s3 you are done.  Common issues configuring this backup method are choosing the correct AWS bucket, region and credentials.  Also, double check where all of your Jenkins configurations live in case there aren’t in a standard location.

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Generate Certbot certificates with a container

This is a little bit of a follow up post to the origin post about generating certs with the DNS challenge.  I decided to create a little container that can be used to generate a certificate based on the newly renamed dehyrdated script with the extras to make DNS provisioning easy.

A few things have changed in the evolution of Let’s Encrypt and its tooling since the last post was written.  First, some of the tools have been renamed so I’ll just try to clear up some of the names if there is any confusion.  The official Let’s Encrypt client has been renamed to Certbot.  The shell script used to provision the certificates has been renamed as well.  What used to be called letsencrypt.sh has been renamed to dehydrated.

The Docker image can be found here.  The image is essentially the dehydrated script with a few other dependencies to make the DNS challenge work, including Ruby, a ruby script DNS hook and a few Gems that the script relies on.

The following is an example of how to run the script:

docker run -it --rm \
    -v $(pwd):/dehydrated \
    -e AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID="XXX" \
    -e AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY="XXX" \
    jmreicha/dehydrated-dns --cron --domain test.example.com --hook ./route53.rb --challenge dns-01

Just replace test.example.com with the desired domain.  Make sure that you have the DNS zone added to route53 and make sure the AWS credentials used have the appropriate permissions to read and write records on route53 zone.

The command is essentially the same as the command in the original post but is a lot more convenient to run now because you can specify where on your local system you want to dump the generated certificates to and you can also easily specify/update the AWS credentials.

I’d like to quickly explain the decision to containerize this process.  Obviously the dehydrated tool has been designed and written to be a standalone tool but in order to generate certificates using the DNS challenge requires a few extra tidbits to be added.  Cooking all of the requirements into a container makes the setup portable so it can be easily automated on different environments and flexible so that it can be run in a variety of setups, with different domain names and AWS credentials.  With the container approach, the certs could potentially be dropped out on to a Windows machine running Docker for Windows if desired, for example.

tl;dr This setup may be overkill for some, but it has worked out well for my purposes.  Feel free to give it a try if you want to test out creating Certbot certs with the deyhrdated tool in a container.

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Running containers on Windows

There has been a lot of work lately that has gone into bringing Docker containers to the Windows platform.  Docker has been working closely with Microsoft to bring containers to Windows and just announced the availability of Docker on Windows at the latest ignite conference.   So, in this post we will go from 0 to your first Windows container.

This post covers some details about how to get up and running via the Docker app and also manually with some basic Powershell commands.  If you just want things to work as quickly as possible I would suggest the Docker app method, otherwise if you are interested in learning what is happening behind the scenes, you should try the Powershell method.

The prerequisites are basically Windows 10 Anniversary and its required components; which consist of the Docker app if you want to configure it through its GUI or the Windows container feature, and Hyper-V if you want to configure your environment manually.

Configure via Docker app

This is by far the easier of the two methods.  This recent blog post has very good instructions and installation steps which I will step through in this post, adding a few pieces of info that helped me out when going through the installation and configuration process.

After you install the Win 10 Anniversary update, go grab the latest beta version of the Docker Engine, via the Docker for Windows project.  NOTE: THIS METHOD WILL NOT WORK IF YOU DON’T USE BETA 26 OR LATER.  To check, open your Docker app version by clicking on the tray icon and clicking “About Docker” and make sure it says -beta26 or higher.

about docker

After you go through the installation process, you should be able to run Docker containers.  You should also now have access to other Docker tools, including docker-comopse and docker-machine.  To test that things are working run the following command.

docker run hello-world

If the run command worked you are most of the way there.  By default, the Docker engine will be configured to use the Linux based VM to drive its containers.  If you run “docker version” you can see that your Docker server (daemon) is using Linux.

docker version

In order to get things working via Windows, select the option “Switch to Windows containers” in the Docker tray icon.

switch to windows containers

Now run “docker version” again and check what Server architecture is being used.

docker version

As you can see, your system should now be configured to use Windows containers.  Now you can try pulling a Windows based container.

docker pull microsoft/nanoserver

If the pull worked, you are are all set.  There’s a lot going on behind the scenes that the Docker app abstracts but if you want to try enabling Windows support yourself manually, see the instructions below.

Configure with Powershell

If you want to try out Windows native containers without the latest Docker beta check out this guide.  The basic steps are to:

  • Enable the Windows container feature
  • Enable the Hyper-V feature
  • Install Docker client and server

To enable the Windows container feature from the CLI, run the following command from and elevated (admin) Powershell prompt.

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName containers -All

To enable the Hyper-V feature from the CLI, run the following command from the same elevated prompt.

Enable-WindowsOptionalFeature -Online -FeatureName Microsoft-Hyper-V -All

After you enable Hyper-V you will need to reboot your machine. From the command line the command is “Restart-Computer -Force”.

After the reboot, you will need to either install the Docker engine manually, or just use the Docker app.  Since I have already demonstrated the Docker app method above, here we will just install the Docker engine.  It’s also worth mentioning that if you are using the Docker app method or have used it previously, these commands have been run already so the features should be turned on already, simplifying the process.

The following will download the engine.

Invoke-WebRequest "https://master.dockerproject.org/windows/amd64/docker-1.13.0-dev.zip" -OutFile "$env:TEMP\docker-1.13.0-dev.zip" -UseBasicParsing

Expand the zip into the Program Files path.

Expand-Archive -Path "$env:TEMP\docker-1.13.0-dev.zip" -DestinationPath $env:ProgramFiles

Add the Docker engine to the path.

[Environment]::SetEnvironmentVariable("Path", $env:Path + ";C:\Program Files\Docker", [EnvironmentVariableTarget]::Machine)

Set up Docker to be run as a service.

dockerd --register-service

Finally, start the service.

Start-Service Docker

Then you can try pulling your docker image, as above.

docker pull microsoft/nanoserver

There are some drawback to this method, especially in a dev based environment.

The Powershell method involves a lot of manual effort, especially on a local machine where you just want to test things out quickly.  Obviously the install/config process could be scripted out but that solution isn’t idea for most users.  Another drawback is that you have to manually manage which version of Docker is installed, this method does not update the version automatically.  Using a managed app also installs and manages versions of the other Docker productivity tools, like compose and machine, that make interacting with and managing containers a lot easier.

I can see the Powershell installation method being leveraged in a configuration management scenario or where a specific version of Docker should be deployed on a server.  Servers typically don’t need the other tools and should be pinned at specific version numbers to avoid instability issues and to make sure there aren’t other programs that could potentially cause issues.

While the Docker app is still in beta and the Windows container management component of it is still new, I would still definitely recommend it as a solution.  The app is still in beta but I haven’t had any issues with it yet, outside of a few edge cases and it just makes the Docker experience so much smoother, especially for devs and other folks that are new to Docker who don’t want to muck around the system.

Check out the Docker for Windows forums if you run into any issues.

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