Defaulting Google search results to the past year

If you spend as much time looking around the internet for answers to obscure questions as I do, you quickly realize that often times, Google will happily present you with results that are many years old and out of date.  This is especially frustrating when you eventually find an answer after spending quite some time searching, only to realize the answer you’re looking for is 5 years old.  For more reading on efficient searching check out this post on the 10 tab rule, which has some useful ideas for better searching in general.

xkcd

There is a trick that will allow you to customize the Google default results.  The key to mapping the Google search terms is really just the URL.  Google uses search parameters for querying, so you can do some really cool things.  Obviously this is a powerful concept, so a lot of useful searches can be mapped.  This idea can be taken further to map keywords to other searches, like YouTube, Google maps, Stack Overflow, etc, or basically any site that provides a search interface.

I have only tested these key/search mappings for Google search results on Google Chrome, so if you use another browser there might be a similar trick, I just haven’t attempted it.  Open Chrome settings and navigate to the “Search” section.

This will pull up a dialog box with a list of default search engines.  Scroll to the bottom of the list and add the following values to the corresponding fields from the screenshot.

The Keyword is just a “>” symbol, and it can be anything really.  I chose the > because it is quick and easy to get to.  The rest is pretty self explanatory.  After the entry has been added, scroll through the search engines and find the new “Google recent” entry – there is a button that says “Make default” if you hover over the search engine entry.  Click that and then click done.

Now when you do a Google search from your search bar it will default to items from the past year.

Bonus

You can extend this trick further to map keys in your Google search bar to do other searches.  For example, you can map a key (or word) to search for image results.  In the below example, I am using “I” as the keyword.

After adding the above snippet into the search settings you can navigate to the search bar, type in I (followed by a tab) and the term to search for and it will automatically do an image search.  The key to making the mapping being a tab completion in the search bar is the q=%s part in the URL.

The last bonus search that has worked for me is the “feeling lucky” search.

That keyword (I used a tilde) can once again be anything, but preferably should be fast to get reach to make searching easier.

One final note

Sometimes you actually do want to search for results that are over a year old.  This is true of information that doesn’t really change often.  So if you are having trouble finding a website you think should be at the top of the search, make sure that the default search result is set to any time.  Ideally you would make another key mapping to handle this searching behavior.

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awesome-rancher

Awesome lists are a newish phenomenon for organizing links and information that have been gaining popularity on Github.  You can read more about awesome lists here, but essentially they are curated lists of helpful links and other various resources that are put together by members of their communities.

There are lots of awesome lists these days on Github, and there are even awesome lists for non-tech categories, including recipes and video games. Oddly enough though through my own searching, I quickly discovered that there was no awesome list for Rancher.

So I decided to give a little bit back to the Rancher community in my own way.  If you aren’t aren’t familiar with Rancher, it is essentially a platform and orchestration engine for container based workloads.  Out of all of the container management and orchestration platforms that have been growing out of the container popularity explosion, using Rancher has definitely the most pleasant experience and easiest to use.  Also, if you are new to Rancher, please go check out the list on Github for more information, that is what it is there for.

Check out the awesome-rancher project here.

The goal for me and for the project is to make awesome-rancher the go to resource for finding useful information.  Therefore, I want awesome-rancher to be as easy to use and as complete as possible so new users have a good jumping off place when they decide to dive into Rancher.

If you are a Rancher community member or even just notice a key resource missing from the list, please either let me know with a comment here, on twitter/facebook, or just open a PR on the project itself (which is probably the easiest).

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Curl on Windows using a Docker wrapper

Does the Windows built-in version of “curl” confuse or intimidate you?  Maybe you come from a Linux or Unix background, and yearn for some of your favorite go-to tools?  Newer versions of Powershell include a cmdlet for interacting with the web called Invoke-WebRequest, which is useful, but is not a great drop in replacement for those with experience in non Windows environments.  The Powershell cmdlets are a move in the right direction to unifying CLI experiences but there are still many folks that have become attached to curl over the years, including myself.  It is worth noting that a Windows compatible version of curl has existed for a long time, however it has always been a nuisance dealing with the zip file, just as using SSH has always been a hassle on Windows.  It has always been possible to use the *nix equivalent tools, it is just clunky.

I found a low effort solution for adding curl to my Windows CLI flow, that acts as a nice middle ground between learning Invoke-WebRequest and installing curl binaries directly, which I’d like to share.  This alias trick is a simple way to use curl for working with API’s and other various web testing in Windows environments without getting tangled in managing versions, and dealing with vulnerabilities.  Just download the latest Docker image to update curl to the newest version, and don’t worry about its implementation across different systems.

Prerequisites are light.  First, make sure to have the Docker for Windows app installed (stable or beta are both fine) as well as a semi-recent version of Powershell.

Next step.  If you haven’t set up a Powershell profile, there are also lots of links and resources about how to do it.   I even wrote about it recently, so I am skipping that step as well.  Start by adding the following snippet to your Powershell profile (by default located in C:\Users\<user>\Documents\WindowsPowerShell\Microsoft.PowerShell_profile.ps1) and saving.

# Curl alias using docker
function Docker-Curl {
   docker run --rm byrnedo/alpine-curl $args
}

# Aliases
New-Alias dcurl Docker-Curl

Then source you terminal and run the curl command that was just created.

dcurl -h

One issue you might notice from the snippet above is that the Docker image is not an “official” image.  If this bothers you (security concerns, etc.), it is really easy to create your own, secure image.  There are lots of examples of how to create minimal images with Curl pre-installed.  Just be aware that your custom image will need to be maintained and occasionally rebuilt/published to guard against future vulnerabilities.  For brevity, I have skipped this process, but here’s an example of creating a custom image.

Optional

To update curl, just run the docker pull command.

docker pull apline-curl

Now you have the best of both worlds.  The built-in Invoke-WebRequest cmdlet provided by Powershell is available, as well as the venerable curl command.

My number one case for using curl in a container is that it has been in existence for such a long time (less bugs and edge cases) and it can be used for nearly any web related task.  It is also much handier to use curl for those with a background using *nix systems, rather than digging around in unfamiliar Powershell docs for similar functionality.  Having the ability to run some of my favorite tools in an easy, reproducible way on Windows has been a refreshing experience while sliding back into the Windows world.

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Limit Jenkins Multibranch Pipeline Builds

As the Jenkins pipeline functionality continues to rapidly evolve – the project documentation (or lack thereof), has been a consistent pain point as a user. Invariably, the documentation is either out of date or completely missing.  I expect the docs to improve as the project matures, but for now, the cake is a lie.  I ran into this roadblock recently, looking for a way to limit the number of concurrent builds that happen in Jenkins, using the pipeline.  In all of my anguish, I hope this post will help others in avoiding the tediousness of finding the seemingly simple functionality of limiting concurrent builds, as well as give some insight into strategies for figuring out how to find undocumented features in Jenkins.

While this feature is fairly obvious for old-style Jenkins jobs, a simple check box in the job configuration – finding the same functionality for pipelines is seemingly non existent.  Through extensive Googling and Stack Overflowing, I discovered this feature was recently added to the Multibranch plugin.  Specifically, I found an issue in the (awful) issue tracker used by Jenkins, which in turn led me to uncover some code in a semi recent PR that basically allows concurrency to be turned on or off.  Of course when I tried to use the code from the PR it didn’t work right away.  So I had to go deeper.

Eventually, I  stumbled across a SO post that discusses how to use the properties functionality of pipelines.  Equipped with this new piece of information, I finally had enough substance to start playing around with the code.  To make the creation of pipelines easier, Jenkins also recently added a snippet generator, which allows users to build out sample snippets quickly.

To use the snippet generator, either drill into an existing pipeline style job using a similar URL as below:

https://jenkins.example.com/job/<jobname>/pipeline-syntax/

Or create a new job, and click on the “Pipeline Syntax” link after it has been created to test out different snippets.

pipeline syntax

Inside the snippet generator there are a number of “steps” to choose from.  From the information I had already gathered, I just selected the properties step to create the basic skeleton of what I wanted and was able to use the disableConcurrentBuilds() function I found earlier. Below is a snippet of what the code in your Jenkinsfile might actually look like:

node {
 // This oneliner is what limits concurrent builds
 properties([disableConcurrentBuilds()])

 // Do stuff
 ...
}

Yep.  That’s it.  Just make sure to put the properties() function at the beginning of the node block, otherwise concurrency won’t be adjusted right away and could lead to problems.  Another thing to note; the step to disable concurrency could just as easily be moved into workflow libraries and applied at the global level and applied at the beginning of all jobs if you wanted to limit concurrency for all pipeline builds, since the code is just Groovy.  Finally, the code will disable concurrent builds on a per branch basis.  Essentially, if you push many different branches it will still build all of them, it will just limit each branch to one build at a time and will queue up jobs for any commits that get pushed after the initial job has been created.  I know that is a mouthful.  Let me know in the comments if this explanation needs any clarification.

While I love open source software, sometimes project’s move so fast that certain areas of it get neglected.  I am thankful for things like Github, because I was able use it to piece together all the other information I found to come up with a solution.  But, I would argue having good documentation not only saves folks like me the time and energy of the crazy searches, it also makes it much easier for potentially new users to look at, and understand what is going on.  I will be 100% honest and say that Jenkins pipelines are not for the faint of heart, and I’m sure there are many others who will agree with this sentiment.  I know it is easier said than done, but anything right now would be an improvement in my opinion.

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Intro to Hyperterm

If you haven’t heard about it yet, Hyperterm (not to be confused with hyperterminal) is a cool new project that brings javascript to the terminal.  Basically, Hyperterm allows for a wide variety of customization and extension to be added to the terminal, yet doesn’t add extra bloat and keeps things fast.  For those who don’t know, Hyperterm is based on the electron project which leverages nodejs to build desktop applications that are cross platform.

At its simplest, Hyperterm is a drop in replacement for other shells, like iterm2 or the default terminal app that comes packaged with most OS’s.  Since Hyperterm is built on top of node (via Electron) it is by default cross platform so works on  Mac and Linux and Windows soon.  Obviously this is a win because you can port your configuration to different platforms and don’t need to reconfigure anything, and can also store your configuration in source control so that if your machine ever dies or you get a new one, you have a nice place to pick things up again, which is pretty slick.

If you know javascript, you can already start hacking on the look and feel of Hyperterm, the Chromium browser tools are literally built into it (cmd+option+i).

Installation

To get started, head over to the official Hyperterm website and download the latest release.

Once that is done and you go through the installation process you are ready to get started.  Just fire up Hyperterm and you are good to go.

hyperterm

The stock Hyperterm is definitely usable.  The real power though, comes from the flexibility and design of the plugin system and configuration files which makes customization really easy to get going with and really powerful.

Configuration

Hyperterm uses its own configuration file to extend the basic functionality.  The docs are a great resource for learning more about customization and configuration.

The process of changing themes or adding additional functionality is pretty straight forward.  All the plugins that Hyperterm uses are just npm modules, so can be installed and managed via npm.  So for example, to change the default theme, you would open up your ~/.hyperterm.js file.

Look for the “plugins” section.

plugins: [],

Add the desired plugin.

plugins: [
    'hyperterm-atom-dark',
    'hyperline'
],

And then reload hyperterm to pick up the new configuration by pressing (Cmd+Shift+R) or by clicking View -> Reload.  You should notice the new theme right away.  A nice status line should show up at the bottom of the terminal because of the ‘hyperline’ package, and there was practically no time spent enabling the functionality, which is a big win in my opinion.

For more ideas, definitely go check out the awesome-hyperterm project.  This repo is a great place to find out more about hyperterm and other cool projects that are related.  The official docs are also a great resource for getting started as well as finding some ideas.

Finally, you can also run,

npm search hyperterm

To get a full listing of npm projects with hyperterm in their name for even more ideas.  Outside of the plugins, you can easily hack on the configuration file itself to test out how things work.  Again, the config is just javascript so if you know JS it is easy to get started modifying things.

Additionally, you can tweak the configuration by hand to customize things like font sizes, colors, cursor, etc. without having to install or use any plugins.  The process to customize these values is similar to installing plugins, just pop open the ~/.hypertem.js file, make any adjustments, then reload the terminal and you should be good to go.

Conclusion

The Hyperterm project is still very new but it is already capable of being the default terminal.  As the project grows in popularity, there will be more and more options for customization and the terminal itself will continue to improve.  It is exciting to see something new in the terminal emulator space because there are so few options.  It will be cool to see what new developments are in the works for the project.

It is definitely hard to adjust to something new but it is also good to get out of your comfort zone sometimes as well.  There are lots of things to poke around at and plugins to try out with Hyperterm.

I can’t remember the last time I had this much fun when I was fiddling around with terminal settings.  So at the very least, if you don’t switch full time to Hyperterm, give it a try and see if it is a good fit.

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